Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 17th International Conference and Exhibition on Nanomedicine and Nanotechnology in Health Care Melbourne, Australia.

Day 2 :

  • Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology
Location: Novotel Melbourne St Kilda, Melbourne, Australia

Session Introduction

Ahmed Sabry Abdoon

Veterinary Research Division National Research Center (NRC, Egypt)

Title: Safety of intravenous injection of 50nm Gold Nanorods (AuNRS) in dogs.
Speaker
Biography:

Will be updated soon.

Abstract:

There is an increasing interest in the application of gold nanoparticles in cancer therapy; however, their toxicity should be carefully assessed before its application in clinical trials. The present work was conducted to evaluate the possible toxicity of intravenous injection of 50nm gold nanorods; this included their effect on hematology, liver and kidney functions, histopathology and TEM for liver, spleen and Kidney. Sixteen Baladi dogs were divided into three groups; control (n=5); acute toxicity (n=5), and long term acute toxicity (n=6) groups. Dogs in the treated groups were intravenously injected with 75µg of 50nm AuNRs/kg body weight, while dogs in the control group were injected with normal saline solution. Blood samples were collected before AuNRs injection, on day-15 and on day-30 after AuNRs injection to study the acute, and up to the six month after AuNRs injection to study the long term acute toxicity, and from control group, blood samples were collected at the same times. Biopsy samples were collected from the control and after the first and six month of AuNRs injection and prepared for histopathology and TEM examination. Blood samples were analyzed for complete blood count, liver and kidney functions. Results showed no aberrant clinical changes after intravenous injection of AuNRs in dogs. Also, no gross morphological changes in size, color and texture of liver, kidney and spleen were detected at biopsy sampling. Histopathological examination of the biopsy samples revealed that, intravenous injection of AuNRs produced mild changes in liver and kidney in at long term acute toxicity group, while spleen tissues were not affected by AuNRs injection. TEM failed to detect AuNRs in spleen, kidney or liver of treated animals either in acute or long term acute toxicity groups. There were mild changes in RBCs, HGB, MCM, total protein, globulin, total bilirubin and creatinine levels in the blood samples taken from dogs in both AuNRs groups compared with control dogs. In conclusion, intravenous injections of AuNS did not elicit harmful effect on liver, kidney or spleen of dogs; therefore, it can be safely used in cancer therapy in dogs without any impairment of their physiological functions.  

Speaker
Biography:

The author obtained Ph.D degree from Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokushima, Japan on 1990. Since 1980 he has been working as academic staf at Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Sumatera Utara. He became professor of Pharmaceutical Technolog/Physical Pharmacy on 1999. His research interest is about the application of alginate in pharmaceutical preparation, such as enteric capsules, gastroretentive drug delivery system, drug encapsulation, gastric delivery system, sustained release, nano capsules, nanoparticles, transdermal preparation, peridental gel, and the biological activity of alginate. He has published about 25 papers in reputed journals. 

Abstract:

The conventional antacids dosage forms have short duration of action due to the gastric emptying process. Since the healing of gastric ulcers occurs when gastric pH is kept above 3-4, so a gastroretentive dosage form of antacids with prolonged its duration of action is needed to produced to faster the heal of gastric ulcers. The purose of this study is prolong the duration action of antacids by preparation floating gastroretentive drug delivery system of antacids using hard alginate capsules. Hard alginate capsules were prepared in our laboratory by using sodium alginate. Then, alginate capsules perforated which 1 hole in body part and 1 hole in cup part, the diameter of hole was 1 mm. Conventional antacids powder were grinded by using Planetory Micro Mill Premium Line (Frittsch) to form antacids nanoparticles. The size of Mg(OH)2 nanoparticles was 186-372 nm and Al(OH)3 was 186-223 nm. Mg(OH)2 and Al(OH)3 nanoparticles were filled into separated alginate capsule,  200 mg each capsule. Buffering action of antacids  to 0.1 N HCl solution was determined on simulated gastric acid secretion. The healing effects of antacids nanoparticles on gastric ulcers was tested using male rats induced by 0.6 N HCl solution. Examinations of gastric ulcers were observed macroscopically (number of lesions and lesion index) and microscopically (histopathology). The results of this study showed that during the experiment for about 12 hours alginate capsules were floated and did not disintegrate in the 0.1 N HCl solution, it disintegrated in simulated intestinal fluid. Floating gastroretentive drug delivery system of antacids nanoparticles using perforated hard alginate had buffering action. In simulated gastric fluid secretion experiment, the capsules containing antacid caused the pH raised above 1.2 and maintained the pH of solution at 3.6 for 12 hours. While, perforated alginate capsule containing conventional antacids powder, the pH of medium reached only to 1.3 for 12 hours. On the capsules without perforation containing antacid nanoparticles the pH of medium was almost no changed at  pH 1.2-1.3 for 12 hours. The holes of alginate capsules and the nanosize of antacids caused the easily reaction between HCl and antacids and neutralized the solution. The healing effect of antacids nanoparticles on gastric ulcers  was faster then that of conventional antacids. It is concluded that hard alginate capsules is potential to be used as new   gastroretentive drug delivery system of antacids.  

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

A novel nanocarrier with great biocompatibility, imaging functionality, and drug delivery ability has been developed. In this work, the carrier poly(ethylene glycol)bis(amine)-modified alginate (Al-NH-PEG-NH2) with  folate (FA) as the targeting molecule (Al-NH-PEG-NH-FA) were synthesized to act as functionalizing agents for UCNPs. The synthesized polymer enhanced the stability, biocompatibility and upconversion luminescent intensity (20-fold) of the UCNPs compared to bare UCNPs. The UCNP-Al-NH-PEG-NH-FA nanocarrier enabled the specific targeting of folate receptor-positive KB cells, as confirmed via in vitro near infrared (NIR) imaging. The anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto the nanocarrier with high drug loading efficacy (81.2%) then the pH-responsive drug releasing ability was measured. The release of DOX from the nanocarrier was pH dependent, and the release rate was much faster at a lower pH (pH=5) than at a higher pH (pH=7.2). The in vitro evaluation of KB cells demonstrated that the DOX-loaded UCNP-Al-NH-PEG-NH-FA provided a sustained intracellular DOX release and a prolonged DOX accumulation in the nucleus, resulting in a prolonged therapeutic efficacy. Additionally, the DOX-loaded UCNP-Al-NH-PEG-NH-FA showed higher cytotoxicity towards the KB cells than free DOX. Thus, the biocompatible nonionic alginate-functionalized UCNPs hold substantial potential to be further developed as effective NIR imaging agents and drug-delivery carriers.

Speaker
Biography:

Will be updated soon.

Abstract:

A simple optical sensor for D/L aspartic chirals using Cd-based nanoparticles coated by β- cyclodextrine is presented. β-cyclodextrine modified Cd-based nanoparticles (CNP) were synthesized by a simple sonochemical technique. The characterizations of CNP were investigated by FT-IR, transmission electron microscope and fluorescence spectroscopy.  CNP sensor works based on the selective host-guest interaction between aspartic and β-cyclodextrine combined with the quenching effect of photoluminescence of Cd-based nanopartciels. The results show the quench accorded with the Sternm – Volmer equation. The mechanism of sensor is discussed. The novel, simple and rapid sensing method exhibits an exceptionally limit of detection at 19 ng/mL of D-aspartic form.

Speaker
Biography:

Will be updated soon.

Abstract:

In this article, interleukin-6 (IL-6)-conjugated with anionic generation 4.5 (G4.5) poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer was synthesized through EDC/NHS coupling chemistry, and the conjugation was confirmed using Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and 2-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR). After IL-6 conjugation, nanoparticle size was confirmed to approximately 70 nm and zeta potential increased from -56.5 ± 0.2 to -19.1 ± 2.4 mV due to neutralization of G4.5 PAMAM. Furthermore, the cellular uptake of the conjugates by HeLa cells was significantly enhanced in comparison to free G4.5, in which the complex has a potential bio-imaging probe in vitro. For further, the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin was physically loaded onto G4.5-IL6 with the loading content and encapsulation efficiency of 9.8 wt% and 51.3%, respectively. The cellular internalization and uptake efficiency of G4.5- IL6/DOX complexes was observed and compared by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry using HeLa cells, respectively. The lower IC50 value of G4.5-IL6/DOX was obtained, this is due to the higher drug loading and faster drug release rate corresponded with greater cytotoxicity. The cytotoxic effect was also further verified by increment in late apoptotic/necrotic cells due to delivery of drug through receptor-mediated endocytosis. Based on these results, G4.5-IL6 is a better suited carrier for targeted drug delivery of DOX to cervical cancer cells.

Saumya Srivastava

Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology (MNNIT),India.

Title: Nanotechnology in cancer therapy using plant resources.
Speaker
Biography:

Saumya Srivastava is a research scholar (Ph.D. Second Year) at department of biotechnology, MNNIT Allahabad, India.

Abstract:

In spite of the advancements in the medical field, cancer stands to be a major fatal disease. This factor has increased the importance of nano based drug delivery systems or nanotherapies for antineoplastic agents, because of its potential of site specific targeting and multifunctionality. Nanotechnology is a fast growing field and has enormous applications in the field of medical science. Nanoparticle biosynthesis from plant extracts with their potential applications in cancer therapy is one very important application of nanotechnology, as these nanoparticles have been observed to be effective against various types of cancer cells both in vitro and in animal disease models.

Herbal therapeutics that involves novel nano based drug delivery systems for cancer therapy is another application of nanotechnology that helps in increasing therapeutic value of the herbal medicine and their bioavailability. The application of nanobased herbal formulations for novel drug delivery systems has been found more valuable as compared to others therapies. These novel drug delivery systems include phytosomes, liposomes, microsphere, nanocapsules, ethosomes, transferosomes, nanoemulsions, polymeric nanoparticles. The efficiency of these different plant based nano drug delivery systems has been investigated against various cancers. These alternative drug delivery systems help in increasing efficiency of drug delivery as well as provide protection the drug from metabolic processes and any physical and chemical degradation. 

Riddhi D. Trivedi

Saraswati Instituite of Pharmaceutical Sciences,India.

Title: Preparation and Evaluation of Si RNA Loaded Polymeric Nanopartilces.
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Riddhi D. Trivedi has completed his PhD at the age of 30 years from Ganpat University. She is the Associate Profesor at SIPS, GTU.She has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and has Vrioous research grants from governing bodies in the field of nano technology.

Abstract:

 

For Si RNA to be delivered various biodegradable polymers are trialed by many researchers. One of them is Chitosan (CS) nanoparticles which have been extensively studied for siRNA delivery but the stability and efficacy of such particles are highly dependent on the types of cross-linker hence attempts are made here with PGA. To address this issue, three common cross-linkers; Ethylene glycol diacrylate (ED)and poly-D-glutamic acid (PGA) were used to prepare siRNA loaded CS-ED/PGA nano particles by ionic gelation method. The resulting nano particles werecompared with regard to their physicochemical properties including particle size,zeta potential, morphology, and binding and encapsulation efficiency.Among all the formulations prepared with different cross linker PGA siRNA had the smallest particle size (ranged from 120 ± 1.7 to 500 ± 10.9 nm) with zetapotential ranged from 22.1 ± 1.5 to +32.4 ± 0.5 mV, and high entrapment(>91%) and binding efficiency. Similarly, CS-ED nanoparticles showed better siRNA protection during storage at 4˚C and as determined by serum protection assay. TEM micrographs revealed the assorted morphology of CS-PGA-siRNA nanoparticles in contrast to irregular morphology displayed by CS-ED-siRNA. All siRNA loaded nanoparticles showed initial burst releasefollowed by sustained release of siRNA. Moreover, all the formulations showed low and concentration-dependent cytotoxicity with HeLA cell lines.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Vamshi Krishna Tippavajhala has completed his PhD from Manipal University, India and postdoctoral studies from Universidade do Vale do Paraiba, Brazil. He is presently working as Senior Assistant Professor at Manipal College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manipal University, India. He has published more than 25 research and review papers in reputed journals and has presented his research findings in more than 20 national and international conferences.

Abstract:

The present study focuses on the formulation, optimization and evaluation of valsartan nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) to improve the oral bioavailability of valsartan. The valsartan NLCs were prepared by ultrasonication emulsification technique and optimised using 23 full factorial design. Glyceryl monostearate and castor oil were used as solid lipid and liquid lipid respectively. A combination of Tween-20 and sodium lauryl sulphate was used as surfactant mixture. The optimized formulations were evaluated for their average particle size, polydispersity index (PDI), zeta potential (ζ), entrapment efficiency, in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters like Cmax, Tmax, AUC, apparent volume of distribution, elimination half-life, elimination rate constant and clearance. The optimized valsartan NLCs had an average particle size of 150.0±2.65 nm, PDI of 0.278±0.0065, zeta potential of -46.1±3.24 mV and an entrapment efficiency of 32 %. In vitro drug release studies exhibited a good correlation with in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. In vivo pharmacokinetic data of valsartan NLCs in comparison to pure valsartan dispersion showed a 1.72-fold increase in the bioavailability when administered orally to male Wistar rats. These obtained results clearly indicate an enhancement in the oral bioavailability of valsartan which may help to modify the dosage regimen of valsartan.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Rehan Khan is currently working as Scientist at Institute of Nano Science and Technology, Mohali, Punjab. Dr. Khan received his PhD on Chemoprevention of Colon Cancer from the Hamdard University, New Delhi. During postdoc at University of Manitoba, he worked on exploring novel drug targets for selective killing of Cancer. Dr. Khan has authored several publications in various journals. His publications reflect his research interests in targeted cancer therapy using nanocarrier for efficient anti-cancer drug delivery. Dr. Khan is also an Editor board member of Journal of Pharmaceutics & Nanotechnology, and Toxicology and Forensic Medicine-Open Journal.

Abstract:

Synthetic lethal (SL) targeting of colorectal cancer cells (CRCs) using SOD1 inhibitor (LCS-1) was reported by exploiting the interaction between SOD1 and BLM. LCS-1 show poor bioavailability due to hydrophobic in nature. LCS-1-loaded nanocarrier (NC) of ~150 nm in size with three layers of polymers namely, aminocellulose, branched poly(amidoamine), and polyethylene glycol were prepared and characterized. Blank NC did not show any cytotoxicity towards HEK293 cells (0.5 mg/ml) mainly due to aminocellulose layer. Whereas encapsulation of LCS-1 was achieved by branched polymer layer. LCS-1-NC showed high selectivity (104 times) towards BLM-deficient over -proficient HCT116 cells and 1.7 times increased sensitivity difference for BLM-deficient cells in comparison to LCS-1 alone. LCS-1-NC induced DNA damage and apoptosis demonstrated that LCS-1-NC is very effective and specific in killing BLM-deficient CRC cells.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Anjana Pandey has completed his PhD at the age of 26 years from Banaras Hindu University and postdoctoral studies from Bose Institute Kolkata. He is Associate Professor in department of Biotechnology, MNNIT Allahabad. He has published more than 50 papers in reputed international/ national journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.                 

Abstract:

Nanoparticle technology has recently shown to hold great promise for drug delivery applications and as suitable nanomedicine due to its favourable properties such as bioavailability, lower toxic effects and targeted delivery. Regardless of the great progress in nanomedicine, there remains many limitations prior to widely being accepted for medical application. The size of the nanoparticles ranges from 10 to 200 nm, about the size of a protein. Because of their small size, nanoparticles can readily interact with biomolecules on the cell surface or inside cell allowing these nanoparticles to penetrate tissues in depths with a high level of specificity.

Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (Titania) are having least toxicity to normal cell in comparison to cancerous cell lines studied in HT29 (colorectal cancer cell line) and T4056 (normal cell line). These nanoparticles are synthesized by sol-gel method in the presence of surface active agent and characterized by xrd, TEM and photoluminescence. The antioxidant activity of these nanoparticles are also tested by standard DPPH method. These results also corroborated our findings of cytotoxicity substantiated with fluorescence microscopy.

Speaker
Biography:

SAURABH SRIVASTAVA

B.Pharm., M.Pharm., Ph.D Scholar, ICMR-SRF

Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery

King George’s Medical University, Lucknow, UP, India.

  • Presently working as the Ph.D Scholar at Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery
  • King George’s Medical University and having almost 5 year research experience
  • Awarded I.C.M.R. National Senior Research Fellowship, New Delhi, India and yound Scientist
  • Completed his B.Pharm. from UPTU & M.Pharm. from AUUP, Lucknow
  • Published around 20 research & review papers in National & International Journals
  • Trainee at Production department in “Uttar Pradesh Drug & Pharmaceutical Limited” (UPDPL), Lucknow
  • Trainee in Quality Control Section of “Lucknow Producer’s Co-Operative Milk Union Ltd” Lucknow
  • Member of the Organizing committee of Various National and International Conferences
  • Presented Various National and International Scientific Papers.
 

Abstract:

5-fluorouracil (5FU) is a chemotherapeutic agent against different types of cancer.5FU loaded with nanotechnology can enhance efficacy over conventional drawback of 5-FU,such as short half-life,toxicity,low bioavailability and non-selective action.Pharmacokinetic profile of this advanced nano-formulation is needed to correlates with overall ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) process.In this study,development of the HPLC-UV method & validation perform in expression of specificity,precision,sensitivity,accuracy and stability of the developed 5-fluorouracil nanoparticles (5-FUNPs) and correlates & collects the valuable pharmacokinetics data.5-FUNPs formulated with polymer poly lactic co-glycolic acid with Oil-in-water/solvent evaporation.Characterizations of nanoformulation performed which included particle Size, stability studies.Analytical method developed and validated from HPLC-UV and applied to pharmacokinetic parameters.

The calibration curve plotted for 5-FUNPs was linear at 267 nm.The lower limit for the quantification found 10.13ng/mL. The size of 5-FUNPs was between 137 + 0.97 to 193 + 0.93 nm & zeta potential between 0.27 + 0.08 to 0.29 + 0.07mv on the side of positively charged. The highest peak for drug concentration, Cmax was 3.235±0.78 mg/L at highest time point, Tmax 7.21±2.52 hrs. The AUC (0-96) & AUC (0-∞) showed 8.89±4.98 mg/L-h and 9.57±3.77 mg/L-h respectively and t1/2 was 22.98±3.73 hrs.

Speaker
Biography:

 Dr.Akhtar Aman  has completed his PhD at the age of 30 years from Peshawar  University under Hec Scholarship. During his Ph.D studies, Dr.Akhtar also worked as visiting Scientist at Center for Cancer Medicine,School of Pharmacy, University college London,UK. He is currently serving as Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutics at Shaheed Benazir Bhutto University,Sheringal Pakistran. He has published more than 10 papers in reputed journals.           
 

Abstract:

Development of efficient delivery system for hydrophobic drugs remains a major concern in chemotherapy. The objective of the current study is to develop polymeric drug-delivery system for etoposide from amphiphilic derivatives of glycol chitosan, capable to improve the pharmacokinetics and to reduce the adverse effects of etoposide due to various organic solvents used in commercial formulations for solubilisation of etoposide. As a promising carrier, amphiphilic derivatives of glycol chitosanweresynthesized by chemical grafting of palmitic acid N-hydroxysuccinimideand quaternisationto glycol chitosan backbone.To this end a 7.9 kDa glycol chitosan was modified by palmitoylation and quaternisation into 13 kDa. Nano sized micelles prepared from this amphiphilic polymerhad the capability to encapsulate up to 3 mg/ml etoposide. The pharmacokinetic results indicated that GCPQ based etoposide formulation transformed the biodistribution pattern. AUC 0.5-24 hr showed statistically significant difference in ETP-GCPQ vs. commercial preparation in liver (25 vs 70, p<0.001), spleen (27 vs. 36, P<0.05), lungs (42 vs. 136, p<0.001), kidneys (25 vs. 30, p<0.05) and brain (19 vs. 9,p<0.001)Using the hydrophobic fluorescent dyeNile red, we showed that micelles efficiently delivered their payload to MCF7 and A2780 cancer cells in-vitro and to A431 xenografttumorin-vivo, suggesting these systems could deliver hydrophobic anti- cancer drugs such as etoposide to tumors. The pharmacokinetic results indicated that the GCPQ micelles transformed the biodistribution pattern and increased etoposide concentration in the brain significantly compared to free drug after intravenous administration. GCPQ based formulations not only reducedside effects associated with current available formulations but alsoincreasedtheir transport through the biological barriers, thus making it a good delivery system.

Mohammad Nazrul Islam

Shaheed Suhrawardy Medical College and Hospital,Bangladesh.

Title: Soft tissue wound healing by laser .
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Mohammad Nazrul Islam has completed his MBBS degree from Dhaka University, and later M.Sc.(BME) from Gono-biswabidyalaya, Dhaka, Bangladesh. His professional intern/training was done at Carnegie Hill Institute, New York, USA.

He is the foundinding head of Biomedical and Medical Biotechnology Department of Shaheed Suhrawardy Medical College and Hospital, Dhaka. He has published papers in reputed professional, national/international forum/ journals and continues academic/ research work at Shaheed Suhrawardy Medical College and Hospital since 2007.

 

 

Abstract:

In 1967 a few years after the first working laser was invented, Endre Mester in Semmelweis University Budapest, Hungary wanted to find out if laser might cause cancer. He took some mice, shaved the hair off their backs, divided them into two groups and gave a laser treatment with a low powered ruby laser to one group. They did not get cancer and to his surprise the hair on the treated group grew back more quickly than the untreated group. That was how "laser biostimulation" effects were discovered.The effects of pulsed monochromatic light, with fixed pulsations and wavelengths, on the healing of pressure ulcers were evaluated in this prospective, randomized, controlled study.

A placebo-controlled, double-blind study using low energy photon therapy (LLLT) was performed in ten patients with bedsore on the back. Treatment was given three times a week for 10 weeks, using monochromatic (red) optical sources; diode 660nm (GaAl-660). The patients who were randomized to placebo treatment received sham therapy from an identical-appearing light source from the same delivery system.Ten patients with bedsore were randomized to receive LLLT or placebo therapy. At the conclusion of the study, the percentage of the initial ulcer area remaining unhealed in the LLLT and placebo groups was 24.4% and 84.7%, respectively (P = 0.0008). The decrease in ulcer area (compared to baseline) observed in the LLLT and placebo groups was 193.0 mm2 and 14.7 mm2, respectively (P = 0.0002). One patient dropped out of the study, complaining of lack of treatment efficacy; he was found to be randomized to the placebo group. There were no adverse effects.

Conclusions:

In this placebo-controlled, double-blind study LLLT was an effective modality for the treatment of bedsore which were resistant to conventional medical management.

The results are encouraging as pulsed monochromatic light increased healing rate and shortened healing time. This will positively affect the quality of life in elderly patients with pressure ulcers.